Keeping Quiet Keeping Quiet

Now we will count to twelve and we will all keep still. For once on the face of the Earth let's not speak in any language, let's stop for one second, and not move our arms so much. 1. What does 'count to twelve' imply? 2. What advantage does the poet see in keeping quiet? 3. How would humanity benefit if people did not speak in any language? 4. Why does the poet ask men to stop all movement? 5. Why does the poet want men on earth to keep quiet?
1. The poet has made an attempt to introspect and meditate. He commences a meditation session so that all could compose and calm themselves before they reflect on their thoughts. It is even symbolic of a year, 12 hours of a clock and even gives enough time to bring the focus of his respective audience. 2. The poet anticipates a positive vibe all around when the people of the world are quiet. He believes it will generate a feeling of brotherhood and give us time to introspect our follies. 3. Poet believes that language breeds discrimination since people are chauvinistic about their language. These differences can only wither away if people for once do not speak. 4. Poet has talked of ceasing all movement so that for once mankind has time to contemplate and assess the damage caused by its progressive streak. He wishes all movement to come to standstill. 5. He feels a tranquil state of existence would lead to love and brotherhood. Being a harbinger of world peace he feels that a status quo of standstill would be conducive to an environment where people can introspect their follies and improvise themselves to make a better world.
It would be an exotic moment without rush, without engines, we would all be together in a sudden .strangeness. 1. What would be an 'exotic moment' for the poet? 2. Explain: 'without rush, without engines'. 3. How, according to the poet, can men be brought together? 4. Explain: 'sudden strangeness'. 5. How can man experience this 'exotic-moment'?
Fishermen in the cold sea 'Would not harm whales and the man gathering salt would look at his hurt hands. 1. What would happen in this moment of silence? 2. What are 'Fishermen' symbolic of? 3. What would happen when fishermen do not harm whales? 4. What message does the poet convey in these lines? 5. What image does the poet create in the last lines?
Those who prepare green wars, wars with gas, wars with fire, victory with no survivors, would put on clean clothes and walk about with their brothers in the shade, doing nothing. 1. Whom does 'Those' refer to here '? 2. Explain: 'green wars, wars with gas, wars with fire'. 3. What does the poet mean by 'victory with no survivors'? 4. What would happen when men 'put on clean clothes'? 5. What lesson will man learn when he just walks about with his brothers doing nothing?
What I want should not be confused with total inactivity. Life is what it is about; I want no truck with death. 1. What does the poet want? 2. What does 'total inactivity' imply? 3. Why does the poet say that he does not want his 'wish' to be confused with 'total inactivity'? 4. What is life 'all about'? 5. Explain: "I want no truck with death",
If we were not so single-minded about keeping our lives moving, and for once could do nothing, perhaps a huge silence might interrupt this sadness of never understanding ourselves and of threatening ourselves with death. 1. Who does 'we' refer to here? 2. What is man 'single-minded' about? 3. Explain: 'keeping our lives moving'. 4. How would man benefit if he did nothing and kept quiet? 5. What is the sadness of never understanding ourselves'? 6. How has man threatened himself with death?
Perhaps the Earth can teach us as when everything seems dead and later proves to be alive. Now I'll count up to twelve and you keep quiet and I will go. 1. What can Earth teach us? 2. What does 'everything seems dead' imply? 3. How will it later 'prove to be alive'? 4. Why does the speaker count upto twelve? 5. Explain: 'you keep quiet and I will go'.
Perhaps the Earth can teach us as when everything seems dead and later proves to be alive. Now I'll count up to twelve and you keep quiet and I will go. 1. What can Earth teach us? 2. What does 'everything seems dead' imply? 3. How will it later 'prove to be alive'?
Why does the poet want everyone to stand still and count upto twelve?
Why does Neruda ask humanity to keep quite?
What is the sadness that poet refers to in the poem?
How does the poet suggest that there is life in nature under apparent stillness?
Does the poet suggest total inactivity and death? Give reasons. Or How does Neruda differentiate what he wants from total inactivity?
What are some of the things that would follow if Neruda command were obeyed?
What kind of wars does the poet refer to in the poem?
What does the poet mean when he says that a chemical war will result in a 'victory with no survivors'?

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